Calendar of Events

November 28, 2017 -
12:00pm to 1:00pm
Location:
817R Cathedral of Learning University of Pittsburgh

Kenneth Schaffner, PhD, MD
University of Pittsburgh History & Philosophy of Science Distinguished University Professor Emeritus

Abstract: The concept of ‘construct validity’ in psychology and psychiatry had its origin in the extraordinarily influential 1955 article by Lee Cronbach and Paul Meehl (also reprinted in the first volume of the Minnesota Studies in Philosophy of Science in 1956). Initially formulated in the context of latter-day logical empiricism, the notion has evolved through various versions through to today, where it continues to influence not only its original disciplines, but has also been used by the prominent behavioral geneticists Caspi and Moffitt as an alternative to genome-wide associations studies (GWAS). However, two alternative approaches to validity in these areas have developed almost independently of the Cronbach and Meehl tradition. One of these, most influential in psychiatry, arose from the work of Robins and Guze on “diagnostic validity” in 1970, and was refined and extended by Kendler in the 1980s. This approach in its most recent version was used by the DSM-5 work groups for modifications of disorders presented in that 2013 publication. A third related but distinct approach involving the use of animal models to advance genetic and neuroscience approaches to psychiatric disorders comes from the work of Willner in the 1980s as well as Nestler and Hyman in 2010. More recently this line of investigation has been analyzed using the Research Domain Criteria (RDoC) framework of the National Institutes of Health.  This talk will summarize the major features of these three approaches to construct validity and propose an integrated model of the concept by drawing on these three traditions.

December 4, 2017 -
5:00pm to 6:30pm
Location:
501 Cathedral of Learning

Medical Humanities Mondays Lecture
Lori Jakiela, PhD
Professor of English and Creative/Professional Writing
Director of the Writing Program
University of Pittsburgh - Greensburg

Elisabeth Kubler-Ross--Swiss-born psychiatrist, pioneer in near-death studies and author of the groundbreaking book On Death and Dying—said of grief, “The reality is that you will grieve forever. You will not ‘get over’ the loss of a loved one; you will learn to live with it. You will heal and you will rebuild yourself around the loss you have suffered. You will be whole again but you will never be the same. Nor should you be the same nor would you want to.” Grief in the United States is often something we’re told should or could be gotten over. Many people do not or cannot take the time they need to engage with and honor loss in their everyday lives.  The idea that grief is temporary, linear, something to move past and not weave into the texture of our lives, can cause pain, especially around the holidays. In this talk, I’ll discuss how traditions and rituals, food and stories, can help us honor and remember people we’ve lost. I’ll discuss how these ideas influenced my own writing, and how important rituals and family traditions have been in my own process of allowing grief and healing to co-exist. Together, we’ll participate in a writing exercise centered on a family recipe or tradition. Together, we’ll explore how writing the narratives that go along with our traditions can help us find, if not beauty, then some sense of order in the grieving process. We’ll also discuss the importance of creating new rituals and traditions that honor those we’ve lost and keep their memories present through generations.

December 5, 2017 -
12:00pm to 1:00pm
Location:
817R Cathedral of Learning University of Pittsburgh

David Danks, PhD
Department of Philosophy
Carnegie Mellon University

Abstract:  This talk will examine the question of perspectivism in science: To what extent are our theories (or models, or…) “perspectival,” or “from a perspective,” or some similar notion? Some of the recent debates about perspectivism have suggested that it is either unsafe (by implying an implausibly strong relativism about scientific theories & knowledge), or else not substantive (by asserting only innocuous banalities about scientific practice). In contrast, I will argue that there are meaningful ways in which our scientific theories are inevitably perspectival, and these very same reasons block any slide to strong relativism (unless we embrace extreme skepticism about the external world). That is, we should embrace a safe-and-substantive perspectivism.

December 19, 2017 (All day)
Location:
LaRoche College, 9000 Babcock Boulevard, Pittsburgh, PA
January 23, 2018 -
6:00pm to 7:00pm
Location:
Scaife Hall - 4th Floor

CF Reynolds Medical History Society
Joseph Losee, MD
Ross H. Musgrave Professor of Pediatric Plastic Surgery
University of Pittsburgh - Children's Hospital of UPMC

January 26, 2018 -
12:00pm to 1:00pm
Location:

Visiting Professor in Bioethics & Public Health
Jeremy Sugarman, MD, MPH, MA
Harvey M. Meyerhoff Professor of Bioethics & Medicine
Professor of Medicine and of Health Policy & Management
Deputy Director for Medicine of the Johns Hopkins Berman
  Institute of Bioethics

January 26, 2018 -
1:30pm to 3:00pm
Location:
Barco Law Building Room 111

Jeremy Sugarman, MD, MPH, MA
Harvey M. Meyerhoff Professor of Bioethics and Medicine
Professor of Medicine and of Health Policy and Management
Deputy Director for Medicine of the Johns Hopkins Berman Institute of Bioethics

February 9, 2018 (All day)
Location:

Confirmed Speakers:

Mark Follman, National Affairs Editor, Mother Jones
Adam Lankford, Professor of Criminology & Criminal Justice,  The University of Alabama
Kelly McBride, Vice President, The Poynter Institute
Emma Beth McGinty, Assistant Professor of Health Policy and Management, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health
Russell Palarea, Founder and President of Operational Psychology Services, LLC
John “Jack” Rozel, Associate Professor of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh


Abstract: Considered a public health problem, gun violence is a threat to every dimension of health: it undermines physical, mental, and social well-being. Concern for the health and well-being of individuals and communities demands drawing attention to the causes and magnitude of this health risk. Yet media attention exacerbates some risks to physical and mental health. While homicide in many communities is a relatively neglected sociocultural phenomenon and health risk, mass shooting events capture public attention through 24-hour news cycles and social media platforms. Coverage of these events often leads to an implication that there can be only two explanations: extremism or illness. Media coverage frequently fuels the stigma of mental illness and false perceptions that people with mental illness are dangerous. Coverage also leads to copycat violence, clustering of violent events, and tactical mimicry by people considering such attacks. This symposium will bring together experts in mental health, violence prevention and public health, law and law enforcement, and media studies.

February 15, 2018 -
8:00am to 9:00am
Location:
Rangos Conference Center Children's Hospital of UPMC

Medearis Lecture / Pediatric Grand Rounds
Sahar Sadjadi, PhD
Assistant Professor of Sexuality, Women's and Gender Studies, Anthropology and Sociology
Amherst College

February 26, 2018 -
5:00pm to 6:30pm
Location:
602 Cathedral of Learning

Alice Dreger, PhD
Clinical Professor of Medical Humanities and Bioethics
Feinberg School of Medicine
Northwestern University

Gender, Sexuality and Women's Studies / Medical Humanities / Bioethics Lecture

February 27, 2018 -
7:15am to 8:15am
Location:
Auditorium - Magee Womens Hospital

Prenatal Dexamethasone for CAH: How Safe Are Pregnant Women and Fetuses in Our Medical System?
Alice Dreger, PhD
Author of  The Talk: Helping Your Kids Navigate Sex in the Real World (2016), One of Us: Cojoined Twins and the Future of Normal (2004), and Hermaphrodites and the Medical Invention of Sex (1998).

February 27, 2018 -
6:00pm to 7:00pm
Location:
Scaife Hall - 4th Floor

CF Reynolds Medical History Society
Gregory Anstead, MD, PhD
Associate Professor
Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine
University of Texas Health Science Center

March 1, 2018 - 9:15am to March 4, 2018 - 4:00pm
Location:
Palmer House Chicago, IL

APPE Call for Submissions invites individuals from all disciplines and professions interested in advancing scholarship, teaching and a general understanding of practical and professional ethics to submit presentations, case studies, pedagogical demonstrations, creative arts, posters, etc no later than October 27, 2017.  One individual submission per person will be accepted.  Submissions are invited on ethical issues in all fields including business, engineering, government, media, law, medicine and science and technology as well as interdisciplinary and multi-disciplinary issues that cut across professions such as biomedical, educational, environmental, public health and research.

March 19, 2018 -
5:00pm to 6:30pm
Location:

Katy Butler
Journalist and author of Knocking on Heaven's Door

Medical Humanities Mondays Lecture

March 20, 2018 -
12:00pm to 1:00pm
Location:
MUH - 7 Main Auditorium

Katy Butler
Journalist and author of Knocking on Heaven's Door

Medicine Grand Rounds